Governments & Donors

Guidance for Analysis of Country Readiness for Global Fund Transition

Aceso Global was tasked by the Global Fund to develop a tool to help countries through the transition process as Global Fund contributions wane and consequently national governments and other in-country stakeholders are expected to shoulder an increasing burden of disease financing and programmatic responsibilities. This Guidance is the culmination of these efforts. It aims to help countries identify financial, programmatic and governance gaps, bottlenecks and risks in the health system that might affect transition.

Specific areas of investigation include service delivery, procurement and supply chain management, human resources, information systems, monitoring and evaluation (M&E), community systems and responses, and health financing, among others. A modular approach allows for flexibility and analysis tailored to country-specific context.

The Guidance was refined following a pilot in Paraguay led by Aceso Global in January 2017, and has since been successfully implemented in Panama and the Dominican Republic.  

 

DOWNLOAD THE GUIDANCE HERE (ENGLISH)

DOWNLOAD THE GUIDANCE HERE (SPANISH)

Sustainability of Global Fund Supported Programs: Brazil Country Case Study

This report summarizes the policies, programs and levels of investment in malaria, tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS in Brazil, linking these to broader Brazilian healthcare initiatives and to both general and specific investments. It provides the background necessary to understanding the contribution of the Global Fund, and the country’s transition away from that support once funding for malaria and tuberculosis ended. Brazil’s strong commitment to health, early establishment of excellence, its depth of technical expertise, and its ability to implement complex health programs has translated into a level of independence that relies on outside support for only part of its agenda. That in turn facilitates adapting to declining external transfers, and an understanding that transition means establishing functioning and funded institutions.

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Governance and Corruption in Public Health Care Systems

This paper examines the relationship between governance and health care delivery, defines indicators for governance and corruption, and summarizes country and cross-country evidence using these indicators. The components of governance and corruption examined include perceptions of corruption and performance, management challenges in public health systems, staff absenteeism, informal payments, and misuse of public funds. Concluding that governance plays an important role in the performance of health services, this paper provides policy options for promoting better governance. 

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Government-Sponsored Health Insurance in India: Are You Covered?

Since independence, India has struggled to provide its people with universal health coverage. Whether defined in terms of financial protection or access to and effective use of healthcare, the majority of Indians remain irregularly and incompletely covered. Finally, and most recently, a new generation of Government-Sponsored Health Insurance Schemes (GSHISs) has emerged to provide the poor with financial coverage. Briefly, the main objective of these new GSHISs was to offer financial protection against catastrophic health shocks, defined in terms of an inpatient stay. Between 2007 and 2010, six major schemes have emerged, including one sponsored by the Government of India (GOI) and five state-sponsored schemes. This new wave of schemes provides fully subsidized coverage for a limited package of secondary or tertiary inpatient care, targeting below-poverty populations. Similar to the private voluntary insurance products in the country, ambulatory services including drugs are not covered except as part of an episode of illness requiring an inpatient stay. The schemes have organized hospital networks consisting of public and private facilities, and most care funded by these schemes is provided in private hospitals. Ostensibly, the objective of any health insurance scheme is to increase access, utilization, and financial protection, and ultimately improve health status. Due to lack of evaluations and analyses of household data, the authors of this book do not examine the impact of health insurance in terms of these objectives. This book is not meant to highlight problems of the GSHISs, but rather to raise potential challenges and emerging issues that should be addressed to ensure the long-term viability of these schemes and to secure their place within the health finance and delivery system.

 

La Forgia, G. and S. Nagpal. 2012. Government-Sponsored Health Insurance in India: Are you Covered? Washington, DC: World Bank.

 

 

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